On My Bookshelf, August-September 2016

sunlight-pilgrimsThe Sunlight Pilgrims by Jenni Fagan (2016)

So, I just didn’t get this book. None of the plot lines really seemed to fit together for any real purpose and I still don’t have a clue while this story takes place during the last days before a modern ice age. Some of the plot points seemed pointless. Overall, it was just random. Not necessarily bad, but it read more like a lengthy short story than a novel.

From Amazon.com: “It’s November of 2020, and the world is freezing over. Each day colder than the last. . . . As ice water melts into the Atlantic, frenzied London residents evacuate by the thousands for warmer temperatures down south. But not Dylan. Grieving and ready to build life anew, he heads north to bury his mother’s and grandmother’s ashes on the Scottish islands where they once lived. Hundreds of miles away, twelve-year-old Estella and her survivalist mother, Constance, scrape by in the snowy, mountainous Highlands, preparing for a record-breaking winter. . . . When Dylan arrives in their caravan park in the middle of the night, life changes course for Estella and Constance. Though the weather worsens, his presence brings a new light to daily life, and when the ultimate disaster finally strikes, they’ll all be ready.”

the-girlsThe Girls by Emma Cline

Overall, I enjoyed this one. But I found the portions set in present day to be distracting without adding anything to the story and Cline has a tendency to poetically-overuse her thesaurus. Lots of scene-setting that ultimately takes away from character building. A nice read though.

From Amazon.com: “Northern California, during the violent end of the 1960s. At the start of summer, a lonely and thoughtful teenager, Evie Boyd, sees a group of girls in the park, and is immediately caught by their freedom, their careless dress, their dangerous aura of abandon. Soon, Evie is in thrall to Suzanne, a mesmerizing older girl, and is drawn into the circle of a soon-to-be infamous cult and the man who is its charismatic leader. Hidden in the hills, their sprawling ranch is eerie and run down, but to Evie, it is exotic, thrilling, charged—a place where she feels desperate to be accepted. As she spends more time away from her mother and the rhythms of her daily life, and as her obsession with Suzanne intensifies, Evie does not realize she is coming closer and closer to unthinkable violence.”

Currently Reading: The Girl with the Lower Back Tattoo by Amy Schumer

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